We are Open!

Yes, we’re open!!
Here at the nursery we are busy planting in the greenhouses, stocking the sales area with trees and shrubs, and taking care of spring chores. It is  wonderful to be moving around outside, getting dirty and being tired at the end of the day-and we are enjoying it. Hopefully, you will find some helpful information as you read on.
If you covered your perennials with deep mulch, remove some, but be sure to leave a little to protect from the freeze and thaw cycle that happens in early spring and can damage shallow roots. If you left foliage last fall on your perennials, you should remove it now. Be careful with the grasses, some have started to green up and you may nip some tips if you wait too long.

It is an ideal time to do some pruning.

Shrubs to be pruned now before new growth begins include:
Alpine Currant
Barberry
Burning Bush
Dogwood
Honeysuckle
Ninebark
Peashrub/Caragana
Purpleleaf Sandcherry
Sumac

Don’t prune these early blooming shrubs until after they finish blooming. :
Azelea and Rhododendron
Chokeberry
Chokecherry
Flowering Plum (usually pink)
Flowering Cherry (usually white)
Forsythia
Juneberry
Lilac
Early Spirea (Bridal Wreath-white)

Prune these fruit trees and some shade trees when dormant (before Mid April):
Oak
Apple
Plum
Flowering Crab
Linden
Ash

Don’t prune these yet, they benefit from pruning when actively growing:
Maple
Birch
Ironwood

Look at the tree and visualize future growth. Thin out any crossing branches or branches that rub. Remove branches that are crowding to open the crown. Remove the suckers that are growing at the base of the tree.
Be sure to use the correct tool for the job. Good sharp hand pruners will take care of most of it and be sure to clean them often. For more information on pruning stop in or read more information from the University of Minnesota Extension Service.

Horticulture & Dormant Spray OilThis is also an ideal time to apply Horticulture & Dormant Spray Oil. This organic multipurpose oil smothers and kills many insects that overwinter on the bark of the plant. If you have repeated trouble with mites, scale, aphids or gall you may find this to be a good solution.

A helpful tip, if you are unsure of what plants you have in your yard, now is a good time to start mapping them out or keeping a journal. We can help identify plants by a portion, picture or verbal description. A diagram and a few notes including basic care are really all that are needed, but some people like to include date planted and other information as well.

We have many new items in stock. Solar Plant Stakes have been very popular. These Solar Lilies are available in purple, yellow, red or white and they add a touch of color to any space.Solar Lily

Many people have been asking about fairy gardening. We do offer classes and group events! More detailed information coming soon….-

Christine

Summertime!!

Summer is here and we have many wonderful things. Stop in, say hi, and share. We would love to see you. We are now open Monday through Friday from 8-6 and Saturday from 9-4.

A few things to watch for as you are out enjoying your gardens. It has been a very moist spring. Many plants have benefited from the abundance of moisture, but we have seen a lot of powdery mildew and some fungal issues. If the problem is mild, pruning or thinning of the plant and removing affected areas will sometimes control it. If the problem is persistent, using a fungicide will be a better solution.

We have not seen many issues with insects. Some mild aphid infestations and Leaf miners in birch. The Leaf miners are little bugs that feed on the inner tissue of the leaf.Miner Their life cycle is about two weeks.  If you choose to treat them, there are many different insecticides that are effective.

As always, we welcome your questions and offer free advice. If bringing in weird samples of your plants or insects, please bag them.

While here, please visit our path of 1000 flowers. It has been a fun project, we are anxious to see it grow!

Thousand Flowers We will see you in the garden~

Christine